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Vision #5

19 April, 2015: Vision #5

READ A POEM

by Caryl Pagel
Vision #5
One kind of absolute actual ceaseless love is the one
where you are trying to keep your beloved alive where
ever he goes you are trying not to let him ever
die one type of enduring true love is a constant anxious vigilance one way to die
is love is
not allowing death you think you will not
but who sees you you want to know this plan of course has flaws but
you cannot let it you
cannot assent to or collapse in the path of another’s ever evolving vanishing you cannot
watch this kind of pain and yet what is another option that you won’t watch

“Vision #5” by Caryl Pagel, from Twice Told. H_NGM_N Books, 2014. Used with permission of the author.
 
ABOUT TODAY’S POET
Caryl Pagel is the author of two collections of poetry: Twice Told (H_NGM_N Books, 2014) and Experiments I Should Like Tried At My Own Death (Factory Hollow Press, 2012). She is the co-founder and editor of Rescue Press, a poetry editor at jubilat, and the Director of the Cleveland State University Poetry Center. She is also an Assistant Professor of English at Cleveland State University and teaches in the Northeast Ohio Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing (NEOMFA).
 

WRITE A POEM

Try something completely different.

Turn on the television or radio (but not the computer) to a station you never or seldom tune into and write a poem on the first words you hear there and/or the first thing you see there.
 
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Comments
Diane Kendig
For me, the poem speaks to those moments sitting bedside, "soul keeping company" as Brock-Broido calls it, but also those hours knowing the beloved is off somewhere dangerous, which is, everywhere.
4/23/2015 11:23:56 AM

Mary Turzillo
Vision #5 is a very powerful meditation on love and death. I will come back to it many times, finding my own meaning and also searching for the poet's meaning.
4/19/2015 9:43:55 AM



READ + WRITE: 30 Days of Poetry is a collaboration between Cuyahoga County Public Library and poet Diane Kendig. Our thanks go to Diane and the poets of Northeast Ohio who allowed us to share their poetry.