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White Boy Blues

15 April, 2016: White Boy Blues

READ A POEM

by Steven B. Smith

WHITE BOY BLUES

Pain from one end to the other
Plagued by a black cloud of druther
It’s the “I Ain’t Got No White Boy Blues”

Though I got no honey for spreading
And there ain’t no money attending
Yet I ain’t got no White Boy Blues

For I’ve roof over rising
A warm bed abiding
Friends fond and affirming
And a past that’s worth hiding
So I can’t get no White Boy Blues

Possessions don’t taunt me
Though lessons they’ve taught me
Like inner, not outer be
And better to let be
The quicker to be free
The taught me do teach me
I ain’t got no White Boy Blues

Yes, it’s a sadness I’m lacking
Or, life’s licking I’m liking
But that’s why I got those
“I Ain’t Got No White Boy Blues”

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“White Boy Blues” by Steven B. Smith from Cleveland Poetry Scenes. Bottom Dog Press, 2008. Used by permission of the author.

ABOUT TODAY’S POET
Smith's publications include Zen Over Zero – Selected Poems 1964 – 2008 (City Poetry Press, 2008); Unruly (Crisis Chronicles Press, 2011); Hip Cat Femur Whack Give a Doc a Bone (NightBallet Press, 2013); and written with his wife Lady, his memoir, Stations of the Lost & Found, a True Tale of Armed Robbery, Stolen Cars, Outsider Art, Mutant Poetry, Underground Publishing, Robbing the Cradle, and Leaving the Country (City Poetry Press, 2012). His greatest achievement is marrying Lady ten years ago and their traveling for 31 months in ten countries on three continents. His poetry and art appear on agentofchaos.com, his blog on walkingthinice.com, his songs on reverbnation.
 

WRITE A POEM

Do an online search for visuals of the word “Bridge,” and write a poem about one or several of the images that you encounter. (If you don’t want to go online, try looking the word up in a large dictionary.)
 

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READ + WRITE: 30 Days of Poetry is a collaboration between Cuyahoga County Public Library and poet Diane Kendig. Our thanks go to Diane and the poets of Northeast Ohio who allowed us to share their poetry.