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Snow Blind

13 April, 2018: Snow Blind

READ A POEM

by Bill Garten

Snow Blind

I guess you are expecting some sort of truth
to follow in the next few words, phrases,
sentences. It would take me longer than that.
Though I have plenty of new paper.
 
Plenty of new beer in the refrigerator. I have enough
fruit and vegetables and soup for the week.
I am snowed in and the sun hits the white fields
and it is like a huge light bulb in a lamp without
 
its shade hitting this paper hard. I keep pounding
on this one thing I know: language. It has no truth
in it – this reporting of my daily tasks, how they
juxtapose to some small irony with a twist
 
like a lemon in a drink, like this moth, fresh out of the closet
beating against this bulb of light, thinking it the moon.

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“Snow Blind” by Bill Garten, from The Last Woman. Dog Ear Publishing, 2015. Used by permission of the author.
 
ABOUT TODAY’​S POET
Bill Garten has published six books of poetry, including The Last Woman. His chapbook, Asphalt Heart, was a finalist in The Comstock Review’s 2017 Jessie Bryce Niles Chapbook Contest. He won the 2017 Broken Ribbon Poetry Contest, and he is a finalist in the 2018 Tucson Festival of Books Literary Awards for Poetry as well as the 44th New Millennium 2017 Awards. Garten has published poetry in Rattle, Asheville Poetry Review, Hawaii Review, Portland Review, Pudding and others. A graduate student in the MFA program in creative writing at Ashland University, he won the Emerson Prize for Poetry and the Margaret Ward Martin Prize for Creative Writing. Follow him on Twitter.

WRITE A POEM

Open a dictionary to the letter “m.” Scan until you find the first word you don’t know the meaning of that intrigues you, and then write a poem about that word.



 

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N. K. Hasen
Mollycoddle Dog

A dog can get mollycoddle
Get the best of the best
Food of high exquisite taste
So expensive; found only in special stores
Owners take their needs above their own
Waiting on their dog hand and foot
They take them to salons to clean them
They give them walks
They wear coats in bad weather
They give them special treats on any occasions
Mollycoddle dogs seem to know
They demand the attention from their owners
If they don’t they pout and whine
Until their owners cave in
Continuing to mollycoddle their dog further
4/13/2018 10:20:38 AM

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READ + WRITE: 30 Days of Poetry is a collaboration between Cuyahoga County Public Library and poet Diane Kendig. Our thanks go to Diane and the poets of Northeast Ohio who allowed us to share their poetry.